used fender electric guitar | anatomy of an electric guitar

Always factor in the size of your instrument. If you are a young player – or are buying a guitar for a child – consider that small hands playing on a full-size guitar may be more difficult than if you had an electric guitar made for kids.
Since chord chart are typically written for right-handed guitarists, they provide a challenge to left- handed players, who have to do a bit of revisualization by flipping the chart around. If a given source doesn’t provide a left-handed version, you can download left-handed charts online.
This list is ridiculous… Jack White?? and a guy named John Mayer is on the list? What were you thinking! Do you have a man-crush on John Mayer??? With all the great guitarists like Clapton, Jeff Beck, Page, SRV, Tom Scholz, Slash, you don’t put a guy named John Mayer on that list…
The Greatest of all the guitar player (mind you there are millions of guitar player out there) , is the one that inspire thousands and make records that last through time. Well we sure don’t know about John Mayer yet.
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The biggest issue when starting out is not to get any bad habits with picking or hand/finger positioning. I’d highly recommend to find a teacher who – not necessarily on a periodical basis – would take a closer look at your progress and technique and make adjustments when needed. There are lots of bad habits that you can get and I’d rather spend some money on lessons than weeks of lifetime to undo those.
First we need to know what an octave is. An octave is the distance between one musical note played at a higher or lower pitch. To hear this on your guitar play the open E string. Now play the 12th fret on the E string. You can hear that it’s the same note. That’s an octave simply because there are 12 semitones in an octave.
The whole book alternates a spread of two text pages, then a spread of photos, etc. etc. (Followed by a reference section about model history.) Like other books by this author, it’s meticulously detailed — in the British style — to please the guitar obsessive lurking inside some of us. Repeated recitations of a given year’s Fender model and price list suggest some narrowcasting to music-industry professionals. But you can skip over those.
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If the Complete Technique book is good for quick starts, this would be the bullet train. Another Hal Leonard selection, this is a trim 48 pages for teaching you how to hold a guitar for the first time. Tuning up, easy chords, and strumming. If you got a guitar on Friday, use this to put together your first three-chord jam by Monday. Will it sound good? No, no, it will not. But you’ll have started, which is key. Some of the other books on this list are dense with both concepts and pages, which might delay your starting. Don’t let that happen.
Place your fingers just behind the frets, so that when you finger the 3rd fret, your finger will be in the space between the 2nd and 3rd frets. Also, be sure to use the very tips of your fingers to prevent them from accidentally touching the adjacent strings.
James Patrick “Jimmy” Page, OBE is an English musician, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and record producer who achieved international success as the guitarist and leader of the rock band Led Zeppelin. Page began his career as a studio session musician in London and, by the mid-1960s, he had …more
Guitar effects and the boxes that generate them have married theory and practice, history and material, content and form. Such strange logics, inherent to all of these simple devices, radiate sincerity in their transgressive sounds. Or put differently, those “unmistakable sounds,” which can enchant an entire generation, are not entirely intentional, but are born from the accidental collisions between transistors, tubes, wiring, and luck.
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A difficult effect to explain, the compressor’s value is in it subtle and careful use. A compressor acts like bumpers on your signal’s amplitude, preventing the volume from spiking too loud while also preventing the volume from decaying too quickly. Because of this, it increases sustain – which is great for solos – while evening out playing dynamics. Country and funk players use compression heavily to achieve spanky and crisp punctuation within their playing. Compressors will add noise to the signal, so many higher end boxes will have a noise gate feature. Other than making cleans sparkle, you can also front-load your distortion or overdrive to get great clear sustain.

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Hendrix was known for a lot of things.The beautiful chord embellishments on Little Wing, the grit of the solo in Voodoo Child screaming off of his strat pickups, his cover of the Dylan song All Along The Watchtower, and the backwards solo in Castles Made of Sand, but known as a great innovative guitar player over and over again. His short but explosive career influenced numerous artists for many years past his death and continues to influence musicians today. To make such a difference in such a short amount of time truly earns Jimi a spot as number two. But…then you may ask, “Who is deserving of number one?!”
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In 2002, Gibson announced the first digital guitar, which performs analog-to-digital conversion internally. The resulting digital signal is delivered over a standard Ethernet cable, eliminating cable-induced line noise. The guitar also provides independent signal processing for each individual string. In 2003, modelling amplifier maker Line 6 introduced the Variax guitar. It differs in some fundamental ways from conventional solid-body electrics. It has on-board electronics capable of modelling the sound of a variety of unique guitars and some other stringed instruments. At one time, some models featured piezoelectric pickups instead of the conventional electromagnetic pickups.
Full hollow-body guitars have large, deep, fully hollow bodies and are often capable of being played at the same volume as an acoustic guitar, and therefore of being used unplugged at intimate gigs. The instrument originated during the jazz age of the 1920s and 1930s, and is still considered the classic jazz guitar, nicknamed the “jazzbox.” Like semi-hollow guitars, they often have f-shaped sound holes. Having humbucker pickups (sometimes just a neck pickup) and usually strung heavily, jazzboxes are noted for their warm, rich tone. A variation (popular in country and rockabilly) with single-coil pickups and sometimes a Bigsby tremolo has a distinctly more twangy, biting, tone than the classic jazzbox.
For me though, the problem with this list, being a “top 100 popular guitarists ever” is that it trades in great guitarists like chet, ritchie blackmore, eric clapton, for their lamer modern day counterparts…john mayer, tom morello, etc. This is just not a top 10 list, its a random list of guitarists that someone thought would be controversial.
It’s all well and good picking the pioneers of Solo guitar but no way are they at the standard of the guitarists out these days. I do think though that Hendrix definitely should be there. The man’s got the best flow I’ve ever heard. David Gilmour is a must. He knows how to make a solo sound good. Clapton isn’t even there? You put Jack White there and Clapton isn’t there? Who the hell compiled this thing????
your right brian i been a acdc freak since u all been out in the early n mid 70s the greast band of all time. and i seen acdc 37 times through out the united states. i love my memories with the band and still watch and listen to the cds and dvds of the band. brian johnson is the best thing that happen to acdc since bond scott death. keep rockin guys i love u with a passion. mark
Distortion and overdrive: Distortion and overdrive units re-shape or “clip” an audio signal’s wave form so that it has flattened peaks, creating “warm” sounds by adding harmonics or “gritty” sounds by adding inharmonic overtones. In tube amplifiers, distortion is created by compressing the instrument’s out-going electrical signal in vacuum tubes or “valves”.[55][56] Distortion pedals produce perfectly flattened peaks or “hard” clipping. Overdrive pedals produce “soft” tube-like distortion by compressing the sine wave without completely flattening it. Much like tube amps, overdrive units produce “clean” sounds at quieter volumes and distorted “warm” sounds at louder volumes. Distortion and overdrive pedals may either be transistor-based or digital.[57][58] While distortion pedals are most associated with electric guitar, they are also used with bass guitar (fuzz bass), Hammond organ and electric piano.
Zactly!!!!!!!! Terry Kath, hands down the greatest ever! Hendrix is on everybodies list as the best, well Jimi said Terry was the best and if Jimi said it it’s good enough for the rest of us. I just can’t believe it took until Sept. 24th 2009 for someone to put his name down! To bad he valued the band concept more than his ego or he would be more well respected.
here’s the GREATEST guitarist of all time– anyone who plays guitar will watch this and find that they can’t play FIVE CONSECUTIVE SECONDS of this song….. and if you say you can, you’re either lying or you must be Mark Knopfler.
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It obviously wasn’t ideal for guitarists to permanently damage their amplifiers for the benefit of experimental tone. Nor was it practical for them to drag immovably large objects on tours. Luckily, increasing experimentation in guitar sound modification collided with the widespread manufacture of electronic transistors in the early 1960s, which replaced vacuum tubes and integrated synthetic distortion in amplifiers. As the transistor revolutionized computing, it also dramatically simplified the production of guitar effects and amplifiers, allowing compact design and portability with little overheating.
Use of audio feedback to enhance sustain and change timbre. Feedback has become a striking characteristic of rock music, as electric guitar players such as Jeff Beck, Pete Townshend and Jimi Hendrix deliberately induced feedback by holding their guitars close to the amplifier. Lou Reed created his 1975 album Metal Machine Music entirely from loops of feedback played at various speeds. A good example of feedback can be heard on Jimi Hendrix’s performance of “Can You See Me?” at the Monterey Pop Festival. The entire guitar solo was created using amplifier feedback.[24]
Learn the C chord. The first chord we will cover is a C chord—one of the most basic chords in music. Before we do, let’s break down just what that means. A proper chord, whether played on a piano, a guitar, or sung by well-trained mice, is simply three or more notes sounded together. (Two notes is called a “diad,” and while musically useful, is not a chord.) Chords can also contain far more than three notes, but that’s well beyond the scope of this article. This is what a C chord looks like on the guitar:
“This is a very complicated mix of economy versus market, demand versus what products are they putting out, versus are their products as good as they used to be, versus what’s going on with the Internet, versus how are the big-box stores dealing with what’s going on,” Smith says. “But I’ll tell you this: You put a magic guitar in a case and ship it to a dealer, it will sell.”
If I could have added more, I would’ve and I most likely would’ve added the artists you all have mentioned (Save Malmsteem. Yuck. Mayer’s soul is ages beyond him), but limiting it to 10 is the whole point of this site.
The guitarist may employ any of several methods for sounding the guitar, including finger picking, depending on the type of strings used (either nylon or steel), and including strumming with the fingers, or a guitar pick made of bone, horn, plastic, metal, felt, leather, or paper, and melodic flatpicking and finger-picking.
It’s been widely reported elsewhere that Leo couldn’t stand F.C. Hall, the initial distributor who advanced much of the capital that Leo needed to start manufacturing. (Hall later headed up Rickenbacker.) But here, Dale Hyatt recalls that Leo wasn’t even on speaking terms with Hall’s successor, Don Randall — whose marketing and sales savvy was vital to absolutely ensuring that Fender products stayed enticing and got noticed.
Other handheld guitar and bass resonators on the market, manufactured under the tradename SRG, produced by Aescher Europa, in Germany, are available in both monophonic (one note at a time) and polyphonic (multiple notes at once) models, which include multiple onboard trigger switch effects, such as HPF (high pass filter) for enhancing harmonics and producing feedback effects, and LPF (low pass filter), producing a bass boost with a cello sound on heavy gauge strings. Later EBow models, such as the plus Ebow, contain a mode slide switch on the back, which allows the player to either produce just sustain or overtone feedback in addition to sustain.[72]
The earliest sound effects were strictly studio productions. In the mid to late 1940s, recording engineers and experimental musicians such as Les Paul began manipulating reel-to-reel recording tape to create echo effects and unusual, futuristic sounds. Microphone placement (“miking”) techniques were used in spaces with specially designed acoustic properties to simulate echo chambers.[25][26][27] In 1948 DeArmond released the Trem-Trol, the first commercially available stand-alone effects unit. This device produced a tremolo by passing an instrument’s electrical signal through a water-based electrolytic fluid.[28] Most stand-alone effects of the 1950s and early 60s such as the Gibson GA-VI vibrato unit and the Fender reverb box, were expensive and impractical, requiring bulky transformers and high voltages. The original stand-alone units were not especially in-demand as many effects came built into amplifiers. The first popular stand-alone was the 1958 Watkins Copicat, a relatively portable tape echo effect made famous by the British band, The Shadows.[29][30]
Noise gate pedals are not necessarily a guitar effect in the traditional sense of the term. The whole idea behind these pedals is to nullify the hissing noise that can occur due to an number of factors, including a hot amp, single coils, a chaotic pedalboard and more.
Originally, a signal would be recorded to two tape machines simultaneously. The playback-head output from these two recorders was then mixed together onto a third recorder. In this form, minute differences in the motor speeds of each machine would result in a phasing effect when the signals were combined. The “flange” effect originated when an engineer would literally put a finger on the flange, or rim of one of the tape reels so that the machine was slowed down, slipping out of sync by tiny degrees. A listener would hear a “drainpipe” sweeping effect as shifting sum-and-difference harmonics were created. When the operator removed his finger the tape sped up again, making the effect sweep back in the other direction.” Famous tunes using flange effects are “Unchained” by Van Halen, “Spirit of Radio” by Rush and “Bold as Love” by Jimi Hendrix. The flange on “Bold as Love” is credited as being the first recorded use of the effect in stereo.
Let me shoot you some names Mr Pro Guitar player. When those you mention can play with the likes of Jack Pearson you can put them on a list. You didn’t even touch on country or bluegrass so I have to assume you know nothing about them. So let me throw this out there. There is only ONE called Mr. Guitar. Chet Atkins. His protege, Jerry Reed is another great. Let’s try Merle Travis, Jody Maphis and in recent years Redd Volkaert. I think you need to expand your listening radius. Let’s not forget the man who likely has his name on your guitar, Mr. Les Paul. Then I would ask you listen to bluegrass flatpicking. You want speed? These guys can play with Ygnwgie and do it on a Martin D28.
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