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A rack of rackmount audio compressors in a recording studio. From top to bottom: Retro Instruments/Gates STA level; Spectra Sonic; Dbx 162; Dbx 165; Empirical Labs Distressor; Smart Research C2; Chandler Limited TG1; Daking FET (91579); and Altec 436c.
As you get better at playing, you will understand that moving quickly from one chord to another sometimes results in odd fingerings that still work. The key is to make the most efficient use of your fingers, and once you kick off the training wheels, don’t be afraid to experiment.
The best way to use this type of book is to just take 15 minutes a day to work through a page or two at a time. You don’t have to find something that requires a lot of study or dedication on your part at this point. Your first priority should be finding a book that gets you thinking about theory as well as helping you develop coordination in both your fretting and strumming hand.
Tell that to Guitar Center, now $1.6 billion in debt and so fearful of publicity that a spokeswoman would only make an executive available for an interview on one condition: “He cannot discuss financials or politics under any circumstances.” (No thanks.)
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Flanger pedals are based on a studio sound made when two tapes were mixed together and one was delayed. What this does is add shifting harmonic content to your signal, as well as modulation. Flanging is a very distinct effect that adds a unique whoosh or airplane-like sound. Used with restraint, the flanger adds an interesting dimension to your sound, almost synthesizer-like sound. Used at extreme settings, flangers will over take the tone and bring a solo to completely different sonic level.
A few guitars feature stereo output, such as Rickenbacker guitars equipped with Rick-O-Sound. There are a variety of ways the “stereo” effect may be implemented. Commonly, but not exclusively, stereo guitars route the neck and bridge pickups to separate output buses on the guitar. A stereo cable then routes each pickup to its own signal chain or amplifier. For these applications, the most popular connector is a high-impedance 1/4-inch plug with a tip, ring and sleeve configuration, also known as a TRS phone connector. Some studio instruments, notably certain Gibson Les Paul models, incorporate a low-impedance three-pin XLR connector for balanced audio. Many exotic arrangements and connectors exist that support features such as midi and hexaphonic pickups.
Distortion and overdrive: Distortion and overdrive units re-shape or “clip” an audio signal’s wave form so that it has flattened peaks, creating “warm” sounds by adding harmonics or “gritty” sounds by adding inharmonic overtones. In tube amplifiers, distortion is created by compressing the instrument’s out-going electrical signal in vacuum tubes or “valves”.[55][56] Distortion pedals produce perfectly flattened peaks or “hard” clipping. Overdrive pedals produce “soft” tube-like distortion by compressing the sine wave without completely flattening it. Much like tube amps, overdrive units produce “clean” sounds at quieter volumes and distorted “warm” sounds at louder volumes. Distortion and overdrive pedals may either be transistor-based or digital.[57][58] While distortion pedals are most associated with electric guitar, they are also used with bass guitar (fuzz bass), Hammond organ and electric piano.
Noise gate: Noise gates attenuate hum, hiss, and static in the signal by greatly diminishing the volume when the signal falls below a set threshold. Noise gates are often used by electric guitarist who play with vintage amps, which can have unwanted hum in the tone, and by guitarists from heavy metal who use high distortion levels, which add noise to the signal even when no notes are being played. Noise gates mute the signal when it falls below a certain threshold. This means that during bars of rest for the guitarist in a song, the hum or noise from the amp or distortion pedal will not be heard by the audience. Noise gates are expanders—meaning that, unlike compressors, they increase the dynamic range of an audio signal to make quiet sounds even quieter.[63] If used with extreme settings and combined with reverb, they can create unusual sounds, such as the gated drum effect used in 1980s pop songs, a style popularized by the Phil Collins song In the Air Tonight.[65][66]
It’s little wonder that Fretboard SE is such a popular guitar book. It focuses on the practical application of learning guitar and relies less on intellectual theory. That is not to say that a guitarist attempting to improve their skills from this book won’t be challenged and introduced to a unique system. It is just to say that the system it introduces is different than you may be used to if you’ve read other books or tried learning guitar from another method. This book teaches around the “CAGED” method. That is, the book will attempt to explain the fretboard layout to you and how to navigate it by focusing on the five basic chord shapes and the root notes in those chords. As you might have guessed, the chords the method teaches are C, A, G, E, and D, thus the name. For a more detailed explanation check out this article from Premier Guitar.
According to Wikipedia, a grimoire is a magical text that instructs the user “…how to perform magical spells, charms and divination, and how to invoke supernatural entities…” In order to summon your own supernatural creations, this guitar-focused text compiles a vast selection of exercises that will help you connect patterns across the entire guitar neck. This 248 page book is part of a series of similar volumes, including The Guitar Grimoire: A Compendium of Formulas for Guitar Scales and Modes, The Guitar Grimoire: Progressions & Improvisation, The Guitar Grimoire: A Compendium of Guitar Chords and Voicings, and so on. You get the idea. Master a few of these and you’re going to to be in excellent shape.
Gibson’s first production electric guitar, marketed in 1936, was the ES-150 model (“ES” for “Electric Spanish”, and “150” reflecting the $150 price of the instrument, along with matching amplifier). The ES-150 guitar featured a single-coil, hexagonally shaped “bar” pickup, which was designed by Walt Fuller. It became known as the “Charlie Christian” pickup (named for the great jazz guitarist who was among the first to perform with the ES-150 guitar). The ES-150 achieved some popularity but suffered from unequal loudness across the six strings.
AT LAST!! some gd stuf about john frusciante, hes the best living guitarist in my opinion. i don’t get people who think those random metal shredders should belong in the top 10 list…. bein insanely good just on technical stuff means nothing… its kinda like shredding as fast as possible on a pentatonic scale, people will respect the skills, but wheres the soul? this is the exact reason why hendrix and jimmy page always get on these lists but not guitarists like buckethead, i mean seriously he has less tone then any of the GnR guitarists.. if slash is not on the list, theres no way the kfc man can get any close. to all the haters, tom morello is a very innovative guitarist and by far more creative then buckethead. I swear the world is no longer a place for good music.
This root note concept applies to many things on guitar. In fact, it applies to pretty much everything that does not use open strings. All scales and chords that don’t use open strings can just be moved up and down the neck. As long as you know which note is the root note, you will be able to find that chord or scale.
The example we just played was a G power chord (also called G5) because the root note under the 1st finger is the note G. If we move the shape up the neck, we can play other chords. For instance, if you move it up two frets you get the chord A, because that is the root note you’ll find under your 1st finger.
Some people like to play the two notes on 5th and 4th strings with a small barre with the 3rd finger. It’s O.K. to do that, but I think using two fingers gives you a better finger position on the notes; you’ll get a better sound that way, it makes it easier to change chords most of the time and easier to get all the thin strings muted. I strongly advise to learn it this way, and then if you still prefer to use the little barre you have the option of choosing whichever one works best in any situation!
This is the definitive source for all collectors of vintage American fretted instruments. In fact, the Gibson Customer Service department frequently turns to Gruhn’s Guide when faced with questions about a guitar’s authenticity or background.
So you’ve picked out your book, ordered it, and got it in your hands. Now what? Believe it or not, how you learn is just as important as what you learn. Generally, books are pretty carefully organized to work as a curriculum as opposed to something you can just pick and choose what looks most interesting from.
Here we have another awesome guitar from Epiphone, based on the 1967 version of the iconic Gibson SG. This ‘67 SG has the authentic asymmetrical double-cutaway shape you’d expect, with a mahogany body and a SlimTaper D-shaped bolt-on mahogany neck, with rosewood fretboard and 22 frets. It looks great, and feels comfortable and well-balanced to hold. The G-310, as we explain in our full review, is fitted with two Epiphone open-coil alnico humbuckers at the bridge and neck, which deliver plenty of warmth and tone to deal with both classic and modern styles. It also features LockTone tuners and a tune-o-matic bridge, with stopbar tailpiece, for good tuning stability. In all, it’s a great modern version of a true classic.

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A floating or trapeze tailpiece (similar to a violin’s) fastens to the body at the base of the guitar. These appear on Rickenbackers, Gretsches, Epiphones, a wide variety of archtop guitars, particularly Jazz guitars, and the 1952 Gibson Les Paul.[16]
Chorus: Splitting the two signals further apart so that they are over a cycle apart in phase allows you to perceive two distinct signals, like two voices together. Called “chorus”, this effect is perceived as less pronounced than flanging and phasing. It is described as producing a “thickening” of the sound, like reverb.
Note that after each chord is a Roman numeral. These indicate what position the root note of the chord is on the scale—regardless of fingering. Once you know the basic chords in all the keys, it’s easier to just show a chart than to have the chord spelled out every time.
Wow, just wow. So many guitarists nominated, but so many great guitar guitarists not even mentioned. Now I’m just an ever-so-‘umble keyboard player with a couple of those twangy things in the corner of the studio, but here are a few outstanding players that come to my mind and are missing …
What about Trey Anatasio? I cannot stand the hippie commune nonsense that follows Phish but that guy is amazing. That man can play anything; literally anything. He has been playing stuff like Peaches En Regalia to perfection live for literally decades. Go out to Grooveshark and find this song and list to it. He is playing sax and xylophone solos to perfection on the guitar. And that is just one example. There are literally hundreds of examples that you can find if you willing to look. Listen to the solo on Chalk Dust Torture off of A Live One. There is no better example of building tension in a solo then that right there.
An electric guitar with a folding neck called the “Foldaxe” was designed and built for Chet Atkins by Roger C. Field.[20] Steinberger guitars developed a line of exotic, carbon fiber instruments without headstocks, with tuning done on the bridge instead.
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